Seminar: “How do I tell an academic organisation that the land is a research participant?: Reflections from an ongoing project on climate change and Indigenous perspectives”

  • Date: –17:00
  • Location: Engelska parken Uppsala university, Thunbergsvägen 3C, room 22-1017
  • Lecturer: Dr. Frances Wyld is a Martu woman (Aboriginal people of the Pilbara region of Australia) and Doctor of Communication.
  • Website
  • Organiser: Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism (CEMFOR)/Dálkke: Indigenous Climate Change Studies
  • Contact person: May-Britt Öhman
  • Seminarium

In this presentation I reflect on the methodology and ethical considerations of an Australian sub-project that is part of the research project Dálkke: Indigenous Climate Change Studies, funded by FORMAS, within the Swedish National Research Programme on Climate, and placed at the Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism, CEMFOR, at Uppsala University.

Abstract

In this presentation I reflect on the methodology and ethical considerations of an Australian sub-project that is part of the research project Dálkke: Indigenous Climate Change Studies, funded by FORMAS, within the Swedish National Research Programme on Climate, and placed at the Centre for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism, CEMFOR, at Uppsala University.

The Australian sub-project documents stories and opinions about climate change, caring for country and the use of Indigenous knowledges in design and innovation to better care for the environment. The work is ongoing during 2019 and the results will be presented at conferences and in articles during 2020. The methodology is a blend of western and Indigenous knowledges characterised by the logos and mythos of information gathering. The logos is the academic pursuit of knowledge on the subject undertaken through literature review and the interviewing of Indigenous academics. The mythos represents Storywork and the stories collected from Indigenous communities and people alongside the needs of this diverse land. But how do you give the land a voice in academia beyond what can be known within science? How do we tell an academic organisation that the land is a research participant? Ethical considerations involved in working with Indigenous communities are important, protocols in academia in Australia were put in place for this. Yet something has been lost in translation; a colonising voice had taken command yet again, leaving the land without a voice and the researcher disconnected from a fundamental participant in research - the environment itself.

 

Bio

Frances Wyld is a Martu woman (Aboriginal people of the Pilbara region of Australia) and Doctor of Communication. She has taught in the areas of Indigenous Knowledges, education, cultural studies and has worked extensively within curriculum development. Her doctorate title ‘In the time of Lorikeets’ uses autoethnography, storytelling and mythography to centre Indigenous Knowledges within an academic environment to establish an Indigenous worldview for ethical research and teaching. She takes great pride in her ongoing collaboration with Sámi academics and community persons. Her publications include both scholarly and creative writing elements. Dr Wyld is currently working on a project led by Dr May-Britt Öhman,  Uppsala University to research climate change, Indigenous perspectives and innovation. She lives in Adelaide, Australia with her son.